A story about the solar plexus centre ( Native American Indian)

A STORY FROM CALLING HORSE TO ILLUSTRATE THE SOLAR PLEXUS CENTRE

The solar plexus is below the ribs and above the naval.  It is the main energy distributor in the body, it helps in the thinking processes (gut feelings) and it connects us to others.

White Owl and the Bear

In times when men and women lived in teepees on the plains and in the forests of North America, there was a young warrior, we shall call him White Owl. He was a brave young man, never afraid to get others out of trouble, whether he had to fight off adversaries or wild animals. One day this young man and his friend Grey Wolf were deep in the forest. They were hunting for the wild bears who roamed freely in those days. These are very fierce animals. They were required for their coats for the winter bedding especially for young children. Winters were very cold indeed and the animals had to be sacrificed to keep us humans alive.

On this occasion Grey wolf was climbing a tree having disturbed a bear, thinking that the bear would not dare to climb as high as he could. He hoped the bear would use his solar centre –  his mind centre, and realise that he would not be safe on the fine, high branches. However the bear continued up and up and Grey wolf began to think that he would soon run out of tree!

The bear looked down and saw White Owl

The bear looked down and saw White Owl

Now White Owl his friend saw the dilemma and decided to act as a decoy for Grey Wolf.  He shouted and threw sticks at the bear who looked down and saw a second adversary at the base of the tree.  The bear had been starting to get a gut feeling that it was about time to turn round and go down again.  Now he had even more reason to do exactly that.  With a huge bellowing roar he reversed down the tree.  This was a slightly slower process than climbing up. White Owl looked at his weapons, he had a tomahawk and a bow and arrows. He and Grey Wolf had spent many a long evening practising their tomahawk throwing by the light of the moon, and he was very accurate. He decided to risk throwing the small axe, which is what it was, planning the throw to coincide with a difficult part of the descent of the bear. He did not have time to think of any other solutions. That he would leave to the Great Spirit.
The tomahawk made a direct hit, straight through the skull of the enraged bear which fell like a stone to the base of the tree trunk. Grey Wolf descended carefully, trembling somewhat and surveyed the dead animal. He clutched his belly and said:

“Well, I think one bear is quite enough for one day, don’t you? Probably enough for one year for me. It’s going to take me a while to recover from this!”

The young men skinned the bear on the spot, leaving the carcass for the wild beasts which would surely find it. They carried the skin home to their families, proudly presenting it to be shared by their mothers for the youngest children in each family. They had been happy to risk their lives in this way for those with whom they had close ties, another solar plexus connection.

For a fuller description of the functions of the solar plexus energy centre go to www.yogastories.co.uk and click on the contents list.  Go down to the last chapter and click on ‘information on the solar plexus chakra’.

Story to illustrate the Heart Centre

This story comes from a Native American Indian Chief named Calling Horse.  He speaks about the importance of the Heart Centre to the people of his tribe.  The heart centre can be felt when we experience strong feelings of love, and in a negative way when we lose a person or an animal that we love.

Making a heart connection to a new camp

In the days when we, a nomadic people, traversed the plains, we found it very easy to set up camp and make a home where-ever we found ourselves. Sometimes it would be in a beautiful valley with river running and plenty of trees for shade. Sometimes it was in the wide open plains. We were very aware of our energy centres in those days, and when a place felt good to stay at for a while, the chief would gather the tribe around him. He would place his hand on his heart, look up to the heavens and then stamp his feet on the earth and say:

“In this place we are well connected. I feel the energy running from my head through my heart. I feel the energy running from the earth through my feet to my heart. This place I love. It will be good for us. Let us stay a while.”  Then we would stay.

In such places where the energies felt good, we would all feel happy and settled. Our hearts would warm to each other and to our animals. Our hearts would warm to the place we were in, to the trees and the plants and animals. The song masters in the tribe would meditate and make up songs about the place we were in. They were actually listening to folk who had lived there before and who had happy memories of those places, whose heart centres had opened and glowed in those self same places.

When it was time to move on (as we were a restless people), we would sing those songs to remind us of the lovely times we had had, and again we would feel the glow in our hearts.
That is the job of the heart centre: to connect us with our surroundings that God has provided; to connect us to each other and to the Great Spirit himself who is always with us, watching and caring. His almighty heart centre must be bigger than the earth and sky itself!

Calling Horse Heart Centre

To find an explanation of the Heart Centre  and other energy centres

or ‘chakras’, click on this link

http://yogastories.co.uk and go to the contents page and find ‘guidance on chakras’ at the end of the contents section.

Throat Centre Story (The Young Brave Chants to the Great Spirit)

This is one of a series of 7 stories on the human energy centres, given to me in meditation by Calling Horse, an American Indian Chief of days gone by. This one illustrates the use of the ‘Throat centre’

The Young Brave Chants to the Great Spirit by CALLING HORSE

In the days when men hunted for food and women harvested leaves to add to the value of the flesh, sometimes it was difficult to find enough wild plants. This was certainly the case if the season was poor or the weather inclement. At these times we would appreciate the stores of dried plants which had been gathered and preserved for the winter by the older women in the tribe. On one occasion I remember times were particularly hard. I was a small boy and I was very hungry; we all were. The winter had only just started and the elders knew that they must eke out their stores for several months to come. The men had not had a lot of luck with the hunting. They had only managed to catch a few small animals; the buffalo were nowhere to be found.

The chief was on the point of deciding to move camp. He wanted to consult the Great Spirit and he wanted us all to pray to make sure we got the right answer about whether and where to go. The adults all sat in a circle around the camp fire. The chief stood by the totem pole holding his staff in his hand. It was very impressive to me as a small child. This staff had great plumed feathers tied to it in several places and a bunch of eagle feathers was attached to the top. The chief would stamp the ground with his feet and then pound the staff onto the earth.

In response we would chant “Aa ee ee ohh” again and again. Now I was disturbed by the urgency of these cries to God. I recognised that we all felt that we were in trouble and I started to cry. My mother held me to her breast and smoothed my head. She said I should not waste my voice in selfish pity, but I should use it to ask for Gods help which would be for all of us. I joined in with the chanting. The chief stamped around the circle facing each member in turn. When he came to me he almost smiled and he lowered the eagle’s feathers to the level of my head. He touched me with them to encourage my efforts at chanting. I felt very proud. My father called me his good brave and I chanted louder and louder. At the end of the ceremony the chief announced that we would move on the next day. The gods had shown him where to find the buffalo. Indeed after two days travelling we found traces of them and set up camp.

My brother was the first to find and kill a buffalo on that occasion. There was much celebration and again we gathered round the camp fire to chant, this time in joyful thanks. The sound was different, it had a happier quality and every one was smiling, even the chief. This time he had a different staff. It had the horns of a buffalo attached to it. Again he brought it round the circle as we chanted. When he came to me I was sure I saw him wink at me. He was certainly smiling and we all felt very proud of my brother ‘Fleet of foot’ who had lived up to his name yet again.

The Chief's staff had the horns of a buffalo

The Chief's staff had the horns of a buffalo

The Crown Centre. A story to illustrate the use of the energy centre at the top of the head.

This story came to me when I was asking in meditation for stories to show an understanding of human energy centres by Native American Indians.  The spirit guide Calling Horse gave me this story.

THE CROWN CENTRE, A STORY FROM CALLING HORSE

When my people became restless the chief would be sensitive to their feelings and desires for a move, but he would always try to move camp at a propitious time. If we were careless about it, we might find that another tribe was occupying the area which we had planned to go to. We might find that food was scarce in the new place. We might encounter disease and pestilence. A move had to be carefully planned and the Great Spirit played a full part in this.

The chief would go into retreat for two days. During this time he would meditate. He also required the elders to do the same. They would also fast so that they would be more ‘clear-seeing’. Some of them would use the fire as their oracle, seeing pictures in it which told them what they needed to know. Others would meditate on the clouds and others would make contact with the tree spirits. One elder I knew would collect beautiful stones, akin to your crystals and would place them on his body as he lay on the ground in his teepee. There he would stay until he had his answer.

All of them were making contact with the Great Spirit through their crown centre,  the spiritual energy centre at the top of the head. Through this the Gods would give them visions and answers to their questions. They would ask specific questions about the place they planned to go to. They would ask about the predicted weather, about the buffalo and its whereabouts. They would ask about the abundance of small animals and about the types of medicinal plants available. They would ask about the presence of other tribes and whether the place would sustain our tribe as well, if another group were already present. We also needed to know if the other group would be agreeable to our sharing the area with them or if they would be hostile. If hostility was predicted we had to decide if we could frighten them off easily, or if they would stand their ground.calling-horse-crown-chakra1

Sometimes it would take the medicine man (who was the chief) and the elders up to a week to find answers to all these questions. Usually they were right but if they had been consuming some of our special brew which contained certain drugs, then their answers would be dubious. Our chief always tried to eliminate the possibility of this happening by banning it’s consumption during these times of decision making, however this was not always obeyed.

There was one old man who found it hard to resist the stuff and who had his own secret supply. He was in charge of ascertaining whether tribes were going to be hostile. On one occasion he confidently predicted that all would be well and we went ahead and moved to a beautiful valley three days journey from our present camp. The incumbents were so enraged at our intrusion that we had to beat a hasty retreat back to where we came from. The elders had to consider all over again the prospect of a move. That particular old man was retired from the job and another more sober individual was trained in his role.  He already knew how to meditate, but he was given a sequence to follow whereby he could call up the appropriate guides who knew about the tribe under consideration. Through his crown centre the answer would come. He would feel the movements of energy at the top of his head and he would know that his thoughts were not his own imagining, but that they were God inspired and therefore to be trusted. If however peoples’ motives were not of the highest order and they were seeking power or possession for its own sake then their answers may have lead to confusion and danger. That was the penalty of having the wrong motives, but a good chief would always see to it that this was not the case.

So through the Crown Centre our lives and movements were regulated. We did not need the sophisticated instruments of the late twentieth century. We had our ‘energy centres’ and the Great Spirit.