Story to illustrate the Heart Centre

This story comes from a Native American Indian Chief named Calling Horse.  He speaks about the importance of the Heart Centre to the people of his tribe.  The heart centre can be felt when we experience strong feelings of love, and in a negative way when we lose a person or an animal that we love.

Making a heart connection to a new camp

In the days when we, a nomadic people, traversed the plains, we found it very easy to set up camp and make a home where-ever we found ourselves. Sometimes it would be in a beautiful valley with river running and plenty of trees for shade. Sometimes it was in the wide open plains. We were very aware of our energy centres in those days, and when a place felt good to stay at for a while, the chief would gather the tribe around him. He would place his hand on his heart, look up to the heavens and then stamp his feet on the earth and say:

“In this place we are well connected. I feel the energy running from my head through my heart. I feel the energy running from the earth through my feet to my heart. This place I love. It will be good for us. Let us stay a while.”  Then we would stay.

In such places where the energies felt good, we would all feel happy and settled. Our hearts would warm to each other and to our animals. Our hearts would warm to the place we were in, to the trees and the plants and animals. The song masters in the tribe would meditate and make up songs about the place we were in. They were actually listening to folk who had lived there before and who had happy memories of those places, whose heart centres had opened and glowed in those self same places.

When it was time to move on (as we were a restless people), we would sing those songs to remind us of the lovely times we had had, and again we would feel the glow in our hearts.
That is the job of the heart centre: to connect us with our surroundings that God has provided; to connect us to each other and to the Great Spirit himself who is always with us, watching and caring. His almighty heart centre must be bigger than the earth and sky itself!

Calling Horse Heart Centre

To find an explanation of the Heart Centre  and other energy centres

or ‘chakras’, click on this link

http://yogastories.co.uk and go to the contents page and find ‘guidance on chakras’ at the end of the contents section.

Throat Centre Story (The Young Brave Chants to the Great Spirit)

This is one of a series of 7 stories on the human energy centres, given to me in meditation by Calling Horse, an American Indian Chief of days gone by. This one illustrates the use of the ‘Throat centre’

The Young Brave Chants to the Great Spirit by CALLING HORSE

In the days when men hunted for food and women harvested leaves to add to the value of the flesh, sometimes it was difficult to find enough wild plants. This was certainly the case if the season was poor or the weather inclement. At these times we would appreciate the stores of dried plants which had been gathered and preserved for the winter by the older women in the tribe. On one occasion I remember times were particularly hard. I was a small boy and I was very hungry; we all were. The winter had only just started and the elders knew that they must eke out their stores for several months to come. The men had not had a lot of luck with the hunting. They had only managed to catch a few small animals; the buffalo were nowhere to be found.

The chief was on the point of deciding to move camp. He wanted to consult the Great Spirit and he wanted us all to pray to make sure we got the right answer about whether and where to go. The adults all sat in a circle around the camp fire. The chief stood by the totem pole holding his staff in his hand. It was very impressive to me as a small child. This staff had great plumed feathers tied to it in several places and a bunch of eagle feathers was attached to the top. The chief would stamp the ground with his feet and then pound the staff onto the earth.

In response we would chant “Aa ee ee ohh” again and again. Now I was disturbed by the urgency of these cries to God. I recognised that we all felt that we were in trouble and I started to cry. My mother held me to her breast and smoothed my head. She said I should not waste my voice in selfish pity, but I should use it to ask for Gods help which would be for all of us. I joined in with the chanting. The chief stamped around the circle facing each member in turn. When he came to me he almost smiled and he lowered the eagle’s feathers to the level of my head. He touched me with them to encourage my efforts at chanting. I felt very proud. My father called me his good brave and I chanted louder and louder. At the end of the ceremony the chief announced that we would move on the next day. The gods had shown him where to find the buffalo. Indeed after two days travelling we found traces of them and set up camp.

My brother was the first to find and kill a buffalo on that occasion. There was much celebration and again we gathered round the camp fire to chant, this time in joyful thanks. The sound was different, it had a happier quality and every one was smiling, even the chief. This time he had a different staff. It had the horns of a buffalo attached to it. Again he brought it round the circle as we chanted. When he came to me I was sure I saw him wink at me. He was certainly smiling and we all felt very proud of my brother ‘Fleet of foot’ who had lived up to his name yet again.

The Chief's staff had the horns of a buffalo

The Chief's staff had the horns of a buffalo