Hello, and welcome to Tessa’s Yoga Stories!

Thanks for dropping by! This is a stories blog. Here you will find over a hundred stories to help children understand issues around ‘human values’, such as love, peace, truth and many other subjects.  Tessa includes subjects such as cyber-bullying, internet dangers, body image and other modern problems.  There are also stories to help adult counselling clients.

To find what you need just look at the categories, or the contents list, or use key words in the search box. 

The age range for each story comes with the title. In 2020 Tessa has been busy with her second book, so she has have not added many stories, but she can write short stories for free, by request, so just ask!

About the book:

Do you want to learn more about the world of yoga? Fancy finding new stories that will help enrich your life and show you how to help others? Want to share uplifting and wholesome stories with friends and loved ones? The Great Little Book of Yoga Stories, Book 1 might just be for you. It is filled with original short stories about the life of Guru Guptananda. With illustrations to accompany each story, the book is designed to help readers familiarise themselves with the rules of life when it comes to yoga and the art of living life well. Ideal for both children and adults, as well being popular with those wanting to learn English, ‘The Great Little Book of Yoga Stories’ is perfect for encouraging readers to view the world with an open and forgiving heart.

Buy from Amazon.co.uk  if you are in UK           
or in the US:  Buy from Amazon.com
 

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Book 2 is well under way now as Tessa writes in August 2020. If you enjoyed Book 1 and you are interested to discover more of the secrets of yoga, look out for Book 2. Tessa will post the publishing date as soon as she can. You can pre- order Book 2 on this blog and your interest will be noted.

Send me a comment and I will reply. Yours in Yoga, Tessa Hillman

The Land of Blue People

This story needs to be read by parents and teachers to assess whether it is suitable for their children. The story is quite stark and you may need to take bits out and soften it for sensitive children.

A story for kids from 9 to 12 years old about the Covid pandemic 2020

The Land of Blue People

This is a strange land I find myself in. It is not what I knew before. I have to behave in different ways to stay safe. I want to stay safe and to protect my family so I pay great attention to the rules. In this land there is some kind nasty stuff that is making those who touch it turn blue. If you become a blue person you have to keep away from other people, because if they get too close they could turn blue. Nobody wants to be blue. A few people become so blue that nobody recognises them any more then they have to go to the land of the Blueys. We don’t see them again. Other people become a lighter blue and if they’re very careful and do the right things eventually the blues fades and they can get close to their families again. They can hug them and be hugged.  They say that’s what they miss most when they are self isolating, hugs and important conversations,  and just having fun with other people.

The children don’t seem to go blue so easily and if they do it is usually only a pale wishy-washy blue, around their eyes and their fingernails. If people think their children are looking a bit blue they take them to be tested, then they know if they are safe or not.  They know if it will be all right to hug their grannies and granddads.  Usually they find they are safe to hug and be hugged. But just in case the testing is not being done, everyone is asked to wear a mask when they are out and about. This is so that they do not breathe in the blueness from another person, or  breathe onto someone else who in turn may go blue.

It is a strange and different life but it affects the whole world and the only way to get rid of the blue is to keep apart from people who are not in your family or not in your ‘bubble’ of people you see regularly. 

Scientists all over the world are busy inventing vaccinations against blueness.  When they have chosen the best one, people will be able to have a dose of the vaccine which will stop them from going blue.  Meanwhile everyone needs to be careful to stay apart, to wash their hands and wear a mask when they are asked to. THE END.

Just a year ago this would have seemed like a strange and unbelievable story but today it reminds us of something very important that is happening in the world: the Coronavirus.  It does not turn us blue but it can make some people very ill, especially older people . Most people recover well from it.  Young people such as you might just feel like you have had a temperature and a cold but, like in the Land of Blue People, you need to think of others and be careful not to catch or spread the Coronavirus.  It will soon be under control we are told, but meanwhile think of others as well as yourself and stay safe.

Talk about this with your parents, guardians or teachers. Every one is in the same boat and we just need to do our best and be helpful and kind.

 

Sal wants a new mouse – a story to educate children about marriage between people of different races, for kids of 5- 10 years old.

Sal Wants a New Mouse

dizzy mouse001

 Sal peeped into the mouse cage. Dizzy didn’t come over for a stroke or even move a whisker, she just sat in the corner looking sad.

“ Mum, I don’t think Dizzy is happy since Dosey disappeared. She needs another mouse to play with!”

“You could be right, Sal, perhaps she’s a lonely mouse now. Shall we go down to the pet shop and get her a new friend?”

Sal jumped up and down, “Oh yes, please, I’ll go and tell Sam, can we go now?”

“We’ll go after lunch, Sal. You and Sam can take out her cage to the garden and clean it, so the new mouse will have a sweet smelling home.”

“Oh, we don’t like that job,” said Sal.

“You know we agreed you can have a mouse or two as long as you look after them. I’m certainly not getting you another one if you don’t look after the one you have.”

Sal sat on the settee for a moment and thought about how she loved to play with her mouse. She imagined not being able to lie on the floor and have her mouse crawl round her hair, and being able to hold it close and sniff its woffley nose.   She sighed a big sigh.

“Ok mum, we’ll do it now.”

“I’m glad to hear it,” said her mum. She winked at Sal and swished her long blonde hair off her face as she tackled the washing up.

Sal ran out to find her brother, Sam. “Sam, we can have another mouse, Mum said so, but we have to clean the cage first.”

“Yuk,” said Sam, “that’s a stinky job!”

“Only ‘cos you wouldn’t help me clean her out last week. I left it.”

Sam’s eyes grew wide, “But I heard you tell Mum you did it!”

Sal’s eyes looked at the floor, “I know, I shouldn’t tell fibs, but I was cross with you, don’t tell Mum, will you Sam?”

Her big brown eyes filled with tears. Sal felt very ashamed.

“Oh, all right,” said Sam, he didn’t like to see his sister unhappy. “As long as you let me name the new mouse. I want to call him Frederico.”

“Oh I don’t think it’s going to be a boy! Dad said if there was a boy and a girl mouse together, when they grew up they would soon have babies, and he said we didn’t want baby mice because we wouldn’t be able to find a home for them,” said Sal.

“Then we could have lots of mice to to play with, YES!” said Sam punching the air with his fist.

The two cleaned the cage out and after lunch they went to the pet shop with their mum.

There was a young girl serving, she said the boss had gone out, and she would be in charge of selling the mice. She said they had just one black mouse at the moment.

“We’d like the black mouse, as long as it’s a girl,” said Sal’s mum. The sales girl picked up the mouse and looked under its tail. I think that’s a girl,” she said. “Let’s take it, Mum, this might be our only chance to give Dizzy a friend,” said Sal.

They took the mouse home and put it in with Dizzy, who got very excited and started running all over her cage and sniffing the new mouse, which Sam called Frederica, a girl’s name.   The children were very pleased with their two mice.

The children’s dad came home after work, “ Ah, what a pretty black mouse, he said, “I hope it’s a she and not a he!”

“Ah, you like her ‘cos she’s black like you,” said Sam. His dad smiled and said, “ I would like her if she was white, black or brown, I like every colour of mouse!”

Dizzy was very happy again. After a just few weeks Sal said to her mum, “ I think Dizzy has been greedy, she’s been eating too many sunflower seeds, she’s quite fat now!”

dizzy mouse001

“Is that right? Oh dear, we’ll have to keep an eye on her then.”

Some mouse babies were born the next day, all hidden away in a tight little nest. “Frederica can’t be a girl after all,” said Sal, “We’ll have to call her Frederico instead!”

Their dad said ‘How come the pet shop got it so wrong. Never mind, I like it that the mum is white and the dad is black, just like our family. It will be interesting to see what colour the babies are, they’re all pink at the moment”

“Perhaps they will be a nice brown colour like we are,” said Sam.

“What ever colour they will be beautiful. We can give them to the pet shop man,” said Mum, “he needs some mice. I think Frederico needs a new home too, unless we want to have more mice.”

Sam and Sal looked at each other and thought about all the mouse cages they might be cleaning out. “Lets give the babies to the pet shop man, and Frederico too, and ask for a proper girl mouse this time!”

“Good idea,” said Mum, so that’s what they did.

Ask questions appropriate to the age of the listeners

Does this story remind you of anything in your life? 

In what ways were the Dizzy and Frederico different?

In what ways were Sal and Sam’s mum and dad different?

What different races can you think of, or what skin colours can people have?  

Do all human beings have the same feelings? What are they? 

Do all people have the same needs? What are they?

 

Ask any other suitable questions to educate the children about Bi-racial, or mixed race families. You might talk about the different races living in different parts of the world, and how over the years people travel to different countries and get married to people from those countries, and have children which look different from their parents because they are a mixture of two races.

If you enjoyed this story please press the like button!

Paddy starts school with a cold potato in his pocket. A story for school starters of 5 years old

Paddy starts school with a cold potato in his pocket

Well hello, you can call me Paddy. I hear you are starting school soon. That will be grand. Things were different in my day. We had to walk to school, or if we were very lucky my dad would put us on the horse. Two kids up on the saddle and two walking, we would take it in turns to ride. I expect you will get taken to school by your mammy, or you may catch a school bus.

On my first day my mam gave me a cold potato for my pocket. That was to be my dinner, but I didn’t really understand that. When it came to dinner time I had nothing to eat as I ate my potato at playtime. Oh dear! I was hungry. I sat on the floor and hid my face. A kind lady spoke to me.

‘Where is your tatty? she asked. ‘Did you eat it before?’

I nodded my head.

‘Awww, never mind. Here I’ve got one for you. You are not the only one you know.’

She sat me down at a table with several other new wee ones. She passed round a bowl with warm potatoes in it. Soon we were all smiling again.

‘ I’ll tell your mammy and your teacher,’ said the kind lady, ‘then you will know when to eat your dinner.’

I had a great day, I was happy at school. They had lots of crayons and games and books to look at. We played games in the playground and I soon got to know the names of the other children in my class.

When I got home I told my mam about the potato. She smiled and said how kind the lady was to give us all another one. She told me that next time I could just bite off the end of my tatty if I was hungry at playtime and I must wait until dinner time to eat the rest of it. She said the nice lady would not have potatoes to give away every day and I had to learn to wait for dinner time to eat mine.

Questions:

Who was the story about?

What was Paddy given for dinner by his mam?

Why did Paddy hide his face at dinner time?

Was he the only one with no dinner?

What did the kind lady give to the children who didn’t have a tatty for their dinner?

What did Paddy need to remember about his potato the next day?

What nice things did Paddy do on his first day at school?

Wu and the journey. A story for 9 to 11 year olds, about integrity

Wu and the Journey.

tight rope story001

I am Wang Cheng. Although I am 40 years of age now I well remember my childhood. Chinese parents were allowed to have only one child as the population was growing out of control. The government were very strict about this. If parents went ahead and had two or more children, families could be split up, fined, or punished in other ways. All my friends were from single child families. This meant that all eyes were on the one child. Grandparents, parents, uncles, aunts, they were all watching and tutting about my behaviour (and that of my friends in their own families). There was a lot of pressure to behave ‘just so’ to try to please everyone. I must say I did my best to make my family happy. I liked it when my grandma put her hand on my shoulder and said to me “Wang, I am very proud of you!” Or when my father took me fishing for the day because as he said “I know you can behave yourself, not like your friend Wu. What are his parents thinking of letting him come and go and do what ever he likes to do?”

My friend Wu was my hero. I just loved the way he was so bold and daring. He did things I did not have the courage to do. I was always afraid that someone might tell me off. I was afraid of tearing my clothes or getting dirty, or of trying anything new in case I could not do it well, and my parents would be disappointed in me.

Wu’s parents had plenty of money but not much time, so they employed maidservants to look after Wu. Actually it was a string of maids that they had one after the other. These girls were very inexperienced in looking after children and they would just let Wu do what he wanted to do. He learned that if he screamed and shouted they would agree to let him do almost anything.

Wu decided he was going to have his own circus. He set up a wire in his backyard with the help of the gardener. It wasn’t very high, just a few centimetres off the ground. He soon discovered that it was quite easy to balance on it and to walk along it. When he fell off it didn’t matter as the ground was very close. He told me I should have a go, but I was afraid as usual. It would have been easy enough but I didn’t want to get drawn into his tricks.

tight rope story001

Soon the gardener helped Wu to raise the wire a bit. It was as high as the seat of a stool now. He could still walk along it and if he fell off he had a safe way of falling, he said. I told him he should show his parents, they would be proud of him.

‘No,’ said Wu, ‘they don’t care what I do. They are so busy working they are too tired to bother with me.’

Wu very much wanted his parents to care about what he did, so he started to dream up a plan. He didn’t think they would care for all his circus skills, his juggling, somersaults and high wire act. He decided to save his money and go on a train journey and then they would have to go and find him. They would have to take some time off work and go looking for him. He liked that idea.

‘You must come with me’, he said to me, ‘ I’m off to Chengdu. I have an uncle there. I don’t know exactly where he lives but someone will know him I’m sure.’

Wu told the maid what his plans were. Of course she didn’t believe him as he was always making up stories. He used to lie about all sorts of things to get attention. She just said  ‘Chengdu is a very big city, you will get lost there. You don’t even know where you live yourself let alone where to find your uncle!’

Wu stopped and had a think. ‘Well, will you write my address down for me so when I want to come back I can show the ticket man at the station?’

The maid laughed at his game and wrote his address down on a piece of card.

‘Look after it,’ she said, ‘or you might never come back!’

Wu came to find me to take me with him on his journey. I refused to go. I thought it was a bad idea although I would have loved to have gone with him. I thought my parents would be too worried if I just went off.

Wu disappeared. I ran to tell my grandma what had happened. She had heard so many things about what Wu had said he was going to do, but never did.

She said, ‘Don’t worry Wang, he’ll be back for his supper.’ I was not so sure.

That night Wu’s father came knocking at our door.

‘Is Wu here?’ he asked.

It was unusual to see him, he usually sent the maid to our place to bring Wu back for his meals.

‘No, he came and told me he was off to Chengdu,’ I said.

‘That’s right,’ said Grandma, ‘more of his nonsense!’

‘You mean you let him go?’ said Wu’s father.

‘Wu has told us so many fanciful things about what he is going to do, I have never tried to stop him because he never does them anyway and because it’s not my place to stop him. It is his parents place – yours.’ Grandma replied.

Wu’s father went red and then he turned white. He looked afraid. ‘He said he was going to catch the train?’

‘That’s what he said, but I didn’t believe him, where would he get the money for a ticket?’ said my Grandma.

Wu’s father rushed off. His wife had recently sacked the previous maid for stealing money. Perhaps Wu has been stealing the money.

Much later Wu told me about what happened that day. He had set off on the train to Chengdu. People were curious about him. They all wanted to know where he was going. They said he was too young to travel alone. He told them he was going to stay with his uncle.

‘Where does your uncle live?’ asked a woman kindly.

‘I don’t know,’ said Wu, ‘someone will know him. Someone will tell me where he lives when I get there.’

The whole carriage has been listening, they burst out laughing; some looked concerned, and some laughed cruelly .

The kind woman asked Wu where he lived. He showed her the piece of card.

‘Where are your parents?’

‘They work all day.’

She looked at his nice clothes and shoes. ‘They will be worried about you, you should go home.’

Wu told me he felt like crying. ‘Yes.’ he said, ‘but I don’t know how to go home.’

The woman looked at the piece of card with Wu’s address on it. ‘I know this place,’ she said, ‘I will take you home.’

They left the train at the next station and climbed onto one going in the opposite direction. Wu was relieved to see his own station, a place he recognised from meeting his father when he had been away. They started to move through the crowds.

‘ Wu!’ He heard his father’s voice shouting his name. Well, he went home with his father, the kind lady disappeared, and Wu cried all the way home.

His father did not know what to say but gradually the whole story came out and Wu’s parents realised that their son was brave and clever, but needed more of their time and attention. He needed their guidance about telling the truth and about stealing. He needed to know about having a good reputation, or a bad one. His parents had to explain that if you do things which give you a bad reputation people will not trust you. They may not believe what you say when it is really true. You may find yourself in danger, as Wu nearly did. He needed to know that they appreciated his skills that he worked so hard at. Everyone needs praise and guidance when they are growing up. His grandma came to stay a while so that the family could sort themselves out.

Questions

Why did Wu want to make the journey to Chengdu?

Did he tell anyone he was going?

Why did they not believe him?

What did Wu’s father realise when he found Wu at the station.

What things had Wu done that you would not do?

What do children need from their parents and carers?

 

Monkey Story 2 ‘The Visitors Arrive’, for kids of 6 to 8 years.

The visitors arrive at the Monkey Tribe’s home

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A story about kindness and consideration towards newcomers.

for children of 6 to 8 years old Story Number 2 of 2 stories

This story is ideal for children to turn into a play with some guidance from teachers or parents. Read the story to the children first and ask the questions posed at the end. Discuss with the children how they would like to act out the story and go ahead.

The day the two new monkeys came along was a day to remember.   All the young monkeys had their ideas about how helpful they were going to be, and how they were going to welcome their new visitors.

When the visitors arrived there was something different about them. They had yellow tails.

The monkeys eyed them up and down.

‘Who ever has a yellow tail?’ they thought . No monkeys had yellow tails in their tribe. They scurried round all checking their own tails.   Brown. All Brown. Was there something wrong about the new monkeys? Why were they different? What else was different about them? Did they speak the same way? Did they eat the same food? Did they sleep at night?

The young monkeys were puzzled. They had heard different monkeys jumping around in the trees before, but didn’t notice much about them. Now here were new monkeys who had lost their families and their tribe was being asked to be kind to them and make friends.

One of the clever monkeys thought he would offer them some berries to show that he was friendly.

Shyly the new monkeys ate the berries.

Then the clever monkey made a long chattering sound and the new monkeys answered him with their own slightly different chatter.

The clever monkey showed them his tail; he proudly waved it in front of them.

One of the new monkeys jumped up on to a branch and seemed to fall straight off it. Just in time he curled his tail round the branch and hung downwards on it showing everyone what a clever tail he had too.

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The monkeys soon realised that although their new friends looked a little different from them, they still needed kindness and friendship, and in their turn they would be kind and friendly too.

They fitted in very well with the monkey tribe and soon all the monkeys forgot about the differences between them, because those are the things that did not matter. Being kind and friendly and helping each other are what matters most.

Questions:

What would you call this story?

How did the monkeys feel about having new visitors?

How did the clever monkey make the new monkeys feel at home? 

What could the new monkey do with his tail? 

Even if monkeys or people are a bit different from us they are just the same inside; everyone – monkeys and people need what?

The Monkey Code, about kindness and consideration to newcomers. Story 1 for kids of 6 to 8 years old

   The Monkey Code

A story about kindness and consideration towards newcomers.

for children of 6 to 8 years old.    Story Number 1 of 2 stories

This story is ideal for children to turn into a play with some guidance from teachers or parents. Read the story to the children first and ask the questions posed at the end. Discuss with the children how they would like to act out the story and go ahead.

The monkeys were having a meeting, they were making a lot of noise and jumping up and down. There were monkey mothers and monkey children and some old grey monkeys too. Nobody could hear what anybody was saying.

monkey-playing001

An old grey backed monkey stood and reached his big hand up to a tree branch. He shook it hard. All the leaves rattled and made a swishing noise. The baby monkeys ran to their mothers and hid. The boy and girl monkeys stopped jumping about and looked at the old grey monkey. They knew he was the leader of the tribe and that what he had to say was important. Monkeys who had been swinging about the branches clambered down to the ground to listen. Monkeys who were grooming each other stopped looking for bits and pieces to pick off their friends’ coats. All eyes were turned to Grey Back.

‘We are all here today because there is some news. Now listen carefully. We’re going to have some new monkeys in our tribe. There are two young monkeys coming to join us. They have lost their families. There was a fire in their part of the forest and they lost their homes. I want to know how you will take care of them when they come. The monkeys looked round at each other. They were very quiet. They knew that this was important and they were thinking hard. They were just imagining how frightened and lonely their new visitors might be. Some of the monkey children replied:

‘I can be a good friend,’ said one.

‘I can show them our food trees,’ said another.

‘I can help them to build a nest to sleep on at night,’ said a third.

The monkey mothers nodded their heads in agreement. It seemed like the young monkeys had learned their lessons well. They had been taught to look after each other and to be helpful and kind.

‘Well done ,’ said Grey Back, ‘if you look after others then they will look after you, but if you are unkind, others will turn away from you, and your unkindness will turn to unhappiness. And that is against the Monkey Code. What do we want? Happy monkeys, helpful monkeys, that’s our code!’

Grey Back gave the branch one last shake then lumbered off into the trees.

‘Happy monkeys, helpful monkeys!’ chattered the youngsters as they went back to their clambering about.’

‘I’m off to find some fruit’ said a teenage monkey.

‘Fruit, fruit!’ whooped the youngsters as they all disappeared into the trees.

Questions

What name would you give to this story – what do you think it is about?

Why did the monkeys have a meeting?

Why were two young monkeys coming to join the tribe? 

How did the monkeys say they would take care of the visitors?

How would you look after new people in school?

Does the story remind you of anything in your life?

The refugee situation – a story to think about

A story of compassion and greed, for people concerned about the refugee situation 2016

refugee-story001The child looked around her. She knew no one at all. Her brother has disappeared the previous day. He said he was going to look for water but never came back. She lay curled up on some rags she had found. Her body was tightly wound into a ball to keep warm. Hunger gnawed at her belly. Her mind was confused, no single thought formed properly. Emotions flooded through her. Shaking and trembling with cold, hunger and fear, she hid her face from the world. No one seemed to be interested anyway. She heard shouts and cries, the sounds of rough men and frightened women and children.

She tried to reconstruct the past she knew, that past which had been shattered by bombs and blood and death. She tried to dream herself back into the life that she had so recently been living…

Her mother cooked at the stove. The kitchen was bright and cheerful, colourful cloth draped the walls. She sat on her father’s knee and stroked his beard. Her elder brother was in the courtyard, she could hear his laughter as he played with his friends. Then suddenly fear came to stay. Planes high above, the sounds of explosions and screams, people running and nowhere to go.

‘What shall we do, my husband?’ asked her mother.

‘We shall wait, there is no place any safer than here,’ said her father.

They gathered in the doorway and watched huge clouds of dust rising in the distance. Her brother flew indoors, aghast and horrified by the noise.

A few minutes later the child found herself on the floor. The air was so thick with dust she could not see across the room. She reached out and felt the body of her father lying beside her, lifeless. Her mother too lay beside the stove, the small flames still sputtered, lighting the dust which gathered on every surface and on the bodies of her parents. She crawled across the room thinking it might be safer to stay low. Under the table cowered her brother, speechless and in shock. She wrapped her arms around him and they remained under the table until after what seemed like a very long time, the bombings stopped.

Then shouts and cries filled the air, wails of sorrow and loss. Someone shouted their father’s name. The man pushed into the ruined kitchen, it was the neighbour, the girl gave a cry.

They were all shepherded out of the ruined houses. She held tightly to her brother’s hand. He couldn’t seem to be able to speak.

There on the rags, curled up, starving and thirsty she couldn’t recall the rest. She didn’t want to. She hoped to somehow get back in time and choose a better way forward, but young as she was she knew that it would not be possible.

refugee-story001

She felt a hand on her shoulder, it was gentle and kind like a mother’s hand. A young woman in clean clothing and with a badge in the shape of a Red Cross peered at her. She spoke words that were unfamiliar to her and offered her a bottle of water. Painfully the girl uncurled herself and taking the water drank deeply.

The Red Cross women held her hand and helped her to stand. She felt so weak she could hardly put one foot in front of the other. She was carried to a lorry where a number of other children waited. They all had a bottle of water and a small loaf of bread. Most were silent, quietly nibbling their bread, their eyes hollow. She pushed the loaf they gave her under her clothes. She couldn’t eat.

At a camp the children were put into tents, boys in boys tents, girls with girls. The older girls helped the younger ones to get what they needed – blankets, water and food.

After a second long journey in a lorry they found themselves in a place where houses were still standing, where people were very poor but friendly, although they spoke a different tongue. She was taken in by a family which already had four children. There was a heavy stone in her heart, which seemed to get heavier each time she thought of her parents and her brother. She could tell no one about how she was feeling as her words were not understood.

Meanwhile in the West people shook their heads in sorrow. A few signed cheques to help those in trouble. A few gathered up unwanted clothes and sent them off in lorries to Syria. A small number of brave, adventurous souls went to help in the camps, but most people did nothing.

Some recalled the two World Wars when refugees were accepted, accommodated and cared for. But somehow ‘War Time’ was different. Then everyone had a personal investment in it. Families had members who were soldiers; many knew people who had lost their lives. Sacrifices were made and expected of everyone. The whole of Europe and most of the rest of the world was involved. People could empathise with the loss and sacrifice.

Attitudes are different now. People have grown fat and rich and are afraid of giving up even a tiny bit of their wealth or their freedom to do exactly what they want to do for themselves. They think that they are not involved in this war in the Middle East. They think they can shut it out, shut the borders, close their eyes to it, refuse to recognise the suffering. Let other people in other countries, which happen to be closer but are not involved in the war, let them take the refugees. It doesn’t seem to matter to the West that many of these countries are very poor already, they are expected to share what little they do have with all the suffering and dispossessed peoples.

Many people in countries in the West seems to be losing the ability to be generous and compassionate and instead focus on keeping what they have, come what may. It seems that the more they have the less they want to give. Is this the equality that is spoken about so loudly? It is time for a rethink.

Questions:

How do you see refugees?  Are they guilty and need to be punished for being homeless? Looking back at your family history, or your friends’ families, how many of them have been persecuted for their race, religion, colour or nationality?  Who helped them to get through and become happy and productive citizens?

Does your heart go out to refugees when you hear about their suffering?

Do you feel you would like to do something but cannot think how you could make a difference?

How do your friends feel about the situation, are they selfish or generous?  

Does anyone express an opinion or do they just keep quiet and hope not to become involved?

Could you afford to give something to the Red Cross or similar organisation that you trust to help these people.

Could you raise some funds by holding an event, large or small, to show solidarity with those who are suffering?  Is anyone in your town involved in this?  How can you find out?

‘Poochie’ A dog story about keeping calm and not panicking, for children of 5-6 years old. 337 words, 2 -3 minutes to read

Subject Resilience

Poochie

poochie002

You know, being a dog is very interesting. Everything smells so different. You have to keep sniffing to see what’s been happening. You can tell a lot from sniffing.

My human, she is called Katie, she can’t tell much from sniffing. In fact the only time I see her sniffing is when she’s sniffing me! She cuddles me and sniffs my head. I hear her telling her mum that I smell nice – sort of warm and fluffy.

‘Are you dog sniffing again?’

‘Yes, I like sniffing Poochie!’

Poochie, that’s what they call me! My real name is Puccini!  I am quite small for a dog. I can fit onto Katie’s lap and fall asleep and she just sits there stroking me.

One day I saw a hole in the garden fence. I sniffed at it and smelt something different. I just had to squeeze through and look around . Katie saw me go. She screamed and shouted to her mother. What a terrible noise she made! I hid behind a bucket. I didn’t want to be with her if she was screaming.

‘Poochie won’t come back if you go on making all that noise. Now dry your tears and get a treat from Poochie’s tin. He’ll soon smell it and come back.’

Well, Katie must have done what her mother told her, because the next thing I knew I could smell my special treat from Katie’s side of the fence. And there was Katie peeping through the hole and calling gently ‘Come on Puccini, come and get your treat.’

poochie002

Poochie peeps through the hole in the fence, looking for treats.

So I followed my nose, didn’t I? Katie’s mum quickly blocked the hole in the fence behind me and there I was being stroked and eating my treats! Then Katie’s mum was stroking Katie’s head and saying, ‘There you see, it’s much better not to panic and scream and cry. Everyone feels better if they keep calm and get help.’

Questions 

What was the little dog’s name in the story?

How do dogs get to know what’s been happening around them?

What did Poochie mean when he says that Katie was his human?

What did Katy like to do Poochie when he was on her lap?

How did Poochie’s nose get him into trouble?

What did Katie do when Poochie disappeared through the fence?

What did Poochie do when he heard her screaming and crying?

What did Katie’s mum say when Katy was screaming and crying? 

How did Poochie’s nose sort out the problem? (Why did he come back through the hole?)

Does this story remind you of anything in your life?

Sometimes it is good to cry and shout and let your feelings out.  Then when you have done it, you can stop and tell people who love you about your problem, and then you feel a bit better about it.  In this story Katie’s mum came quickly to help, and that was when Katie needed to stop screaming and crying, so she did!

 

 

 

 

 

Young girl dies after taking ‘teddies’. A story about taking drugs for 11yrs to teenage.

Sharon learns something about drugs

Sharon's Avatar

Sharon was bored again. She heard something on the news about a girl of 12 who died after taking something called ‘teddies’. It was a made to look harmless and fun in the shape of a teddy’s head. She searched for ‘teddies’ on her laptop . Immediately she found a site which claimed to advise people about drugs. There were a few questions and answers about taking unknown pills, and then she found this poem. It grabbed her attention.

“I destroy homes, tear families apart – take your children, and that’s just the start.
I’m more costly than diamonds, more costly than gold – the sorrow I bring is a sight to behold.
And if you need me, remember I’m easily found.
I live all around you, in schools and in town.
I live with the rich, I live with the poor, I live down the street, and maybe next door.
My power is awesome – try me you’ll see.
But if you do, you may never break free.
Just try me once and I might let you go, but try me twice, and I’ll own your soul.
When I possess you, you’ll steal and you’ll lie.
You’ll do what you have to just to get high.
The crimes you’ll commit, for my narcotic charms, will be worth the pleasure you’ll feel in your arms.
You’ll lie to your mother; you’ll steal from your dad.
When you see their tears, you should feel sad.
But you’ll forget your morals and how you were raised.
I’ll be your conscience, I’ll teach you my ways.
I take kids from parents, and parents from kids, I turn people from God, and separate from friends.
I’ll take everything from you, your looks and your pride, I’ll be with you always, right by your side.
You’ll give up everything – your family, your home, your friends, your money, then you’ll be alone.
I’ll take and I’ll take, till you have nothing more to give.
When I’m finished with you you’ll be lucky to live.
If you try me be warned this is no game. 
If given the chance, I’ll drive you insane.
I’ll ravish your body, I’ll control your mind.
I’ll own you completely; your soul will be mine.
The nightmares I’ll give you while lying in bed.
The voices you’ll hear from inside your head.
The sweats, the shakes, the visions you’ll see.
I want you to know, these are all gifts from me.
But then it’s too late, and you’ll know in your heart, that you are mine, and we shall not part.
You’ll regret that you tried me, they always do.
But you came to me, not I to you.
You knew this would happen. 
Many times you were told, but you challenged my power, and chose to be bold.
You could have said no, and just walked away.
If you could live that day over, now what would you say?
I’ll be your master; you will be my slave.
I’ll even go with you, when you go to your grave.
Now that you have met me, what will you do?
Will you try me or not? 
Its all up to you.
I can bring you more misery than words can tell.
Come take my hand, let me lead you to hell.”
by
Samantha Reynolds

Crystal, hash, teddies, they have many names and many effects. Young people may be tempted to try them. They may be told that it’s cool to take them, that their lives will be more exciting, and that the drugs are not addictive. Their friends may be taking them, or they meet someone in the street who is young and smiling, who offers friendship and kindness, and drugs. What to do? How bad is it? How bad could it be?

Just picture your mother or father finding you slumped in a corner unable to move. That’s how bad it can be. Picture your grandma dabbing her eyes with her hanky and saying, ‘She shouldn’t have died before me.’

It can be that bad. Or it can send you to a mental hospital. Your brain is a delicate instrument. Some of these drugs are contaminated or are much stronger than you think; you just don’t know what you are swallowing or sniffing or injecting.

Or it can go so well that you want to find more. You can’t stop thinking about it. It was so good you were able to forget all your troubles. You need more, but it costs money and you don’t have enough. You steal from your parents. Eventually they get so angry with you that you leave home. You are on the street with no money, no food and no drugs. You steal from an old lady; you take her bag. She is so frightened and shocked that she falls over and hits her head and dies. You go to prison. You think you might be among friends in prison but you are not. They are violent and dangerous people and they hurt you. This is a black tale, but it happens far more than you want to know, and all because someone was tempted to ‘have some fun’.

It can be a very slippery slope and slippery slopes are almost impossible to climb out of. Suicides are common among drug users. Don’t become one, ever. You can always find people who say they have been using drugs for years and are still OK, but there are many who are not. Surely it is not worth the risk?

Questions:

What questions would you like to ask? Don’t be afraid to ask an informed adult, someone you trust. Do not ask a drug user, they will probably not give you an honest answer.